Glacier Grey, Torres del Paine National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Imagine wide, open landscapes, turquoise lakes, snow-capped mountains and ancient forests. Welcome to Patagonia. It is easy to understand why this area of the world, despite being remote, is a favourite amongst tourists.

I spent three weeks travelling around the region, going from Chile to Argentina and back again. I saw the landscape on foot, through a bus window and from a plane, watched guanacos as they jumped past and stood perfectly still so as not to scare the penguin that was crossing my path.

With lots of things to do in Southern Patagonia, it is often difficult to know where to start and what to pick. Here are some favourites that you should not miss while coming to this region:…

View over Ushuaia, Patagonia, Argentina

Ushuaia, the world’s southernmost city, often calls itself the ‘end of the world’. Yet, when we arrived here, the city had anything but an end-of-the-world feeling. It was big and lively, with shops selling everything you could possibly need. And since residents have tax advantages over the rest of Argentina, the city has grown over the past decade.

For tourists, Ushuaia has a lot to offer. We stayed for two and a half days but could easily have found something to do for another two or three days. Upon arrival, I suggest you stop by the tourist information to get a map and excellent free info brochures about Ushuaia. And then go out and check out the following sights and activities:…

Mountains near El Chalten, Patagonia, Argentina

El Chalten does not have a long tradition. The town was founded in 1985, as a border outpost to race Chile who was also claiming land in Patagonia. Around two thousand people live here, although it feels a lot larger with thousands of tourist coming to visit in high season.

El Chalten is known for its excellent hiking, although even for those who do not like to walk, there are a couple of things to do in the area. I have tried to put together a list of things you could do, trying to include as much of a variety as I could. El Chalten might be the capital of hiking but that doesn’t mean there aren’t more things to explore.…

Multi-coloured mountains, Quebrada de Humahuaca, Argentina

Located north of Salta, almost in Bolivia, the Quebrada de Humahuaca is a place unlike anything else in Argentina. A gorge in between two mountain ranges offers multi-coloured hills, forests of cacti, a unique culture and many historical sights. It is not a surprise that this valley was declared a world heritage site by Unesco.…

Jesuit Mission of La Santisima Trinidad de Parana, Paraguay

One of Paraguay’s biggest tourist attractions are the Jesuit missions located in the south of the country. When researching Paraguay, I could not find much practical information about them, so I decided to put together a guide on how to visit those ruins and also the ones located on the other side of the river, near Posadas in Argentina.

If you’ve never heard of the Jesuit missions, they are settlements founded by the Jesuits in colonial times. They were inhabited by natives, who were westernised and educated in Christianity, but in return were protected from enslavement.

The Jesuits’ power grew so much that the Spanish crown got afraid of them and eventually expelled them from South America. Their missions fell into disrepair and their ruins, located in Paraguay, Argentina and Brazil, can now be visited.…

Buenos Aires, Argentina

It is easy to fall in love with Buenos Aires. With its beautiful architecture, its wide boulevards and its friendly inhabitants, the porteños, it is unlike any other place in South America. Often called the Paris of the South, it makes for a funny mixture between European and Latinamerican elements. A wide range of attractions and activities can keep you occupied for days. If you’re wondering where to start, here are some of my favourites that I enjoyed while staying in Buenos Aires:…

Manzana Jesuitica, Cordoba, Argentina

Cordoba is one of the oldest cities in Argentina. With more than a million inhabitants, it is the country’s second largest city and is well-known for its many universities. The city center is made up of many beautiful colonial buildings and the student bars make the city come alive at night. If you get tired of Cordoba, you can easily escape to the nearby mountains or one of the surrounding historical villages. But before you do so, make sure to check out the following sights in Cordoba itself:…